Chance game device

Abstract

Claims

Aug. 27, 1935. c. P. OII\IEIL 2,012,544 CHANCE GAME DEVICE Filed June 17, 1933- 3 sheet -sheet 1 INVENTOR Oiza rZes J? Ojl il V M, 6 k ATTORNEYS Aug. 27, 1935. c. P. O NEIL 2,012,544 CHANCE GAME DEVICE Filed June 17, 1933 s sheets-sheet 2 INVENTOR Charles P OZVLZ 4 BY (a-K1 M t ATTORNEYS Aug. 27, 1935. c. P. ONEIL CHANCE GAME DEVICE Filed June 17, 1953 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTOR s I? ON l I Wm: M ' ATTORNEYS Charla 5 portrayinga game of chance. Patented Aug. 27 1935 L CHANCE GAM'EV'DEVICE chan er. ONeil, Chicago, m.- g V Application June 17; 1933, Serial mama 19 Claims. (c1. ave -'13s) The present invention relates generally to improvements in game devices, and hasf'for its primary object the provision of a new and improved device adapted to present an animated display Other objectsfiof theinvention reside in the provision of a novelchance game device which is particularly suitable [for use asv an advertising medium, forexamplein window displays and on signlooards. g I . Still a further object: is to provide a game 'device of the foregoing character whichis unique, simple in character, and by reason of the element ofchance, capable of attracting and hold? ing the attention of the observer. Further objects and advantages will become apparent as thedescription proceeds. In the accompanying drawings,-Fig.l is afragmentary perspective view, partially diagrammatic in character, of a game device embodying the features of my invention. Fig. 2 is an enlarged side elevationalviewof the chance control apparatus. ' Fig. 3 is. a fragmentary sectional view of the, control apparatus taken substantially along line Y 33'0f Fig. 2. g v Fig. 4 is a fragmentary 'sectional'view taken substantially along line 4-4 of Fig. 2 and illustrating a trip mechanism "forming part of the ap-' paratus. Fig. 5 is a fragmentary sectional view taken substantially along line 55 of Fig. 2 and illustrating a stop mechanism. I of the trip mechanism. Fig.6 is a detailed fragmentary sectional view Fig. 7 is a. fragmentary sectional view taken 7 sub-stantiallyalong line'L-l of Fig. 2, and illus-. trating a switch operating mechanism. Fig. 8 is a tragmentary side elevational view 'of the construction shown in Fig. '7. Fig. 9 is a perspective view-of a selector switch unit. Fig. 1D is afragmentary vertical sectional view illustrating the detailed constructionand operation of the switch unit. Fig. 11 is a sectional view of a master switch embodied in the switch unit. V V .Fig. 12 is a face view in vertical elevation of the selector contact element coactingwiththe switch unit. I i ' 13 is a fragmentary view of a brake mechanism for the selector element. 1 r Fig. l4 is a diagrammatic representation of the electric circuitsfor the game device. Whileithe invention is susceptibleidf various" modifications and. alternative constructions;i I' have shown inthe. drawings and will herein de scribe in detail'the; preferred embodimenarbut 5.. it is to be understood that Idonot thereby intend to limit the invention to the specificiorm dis closed. but intend'to coverall modifications and alternative constructions falling within the spirit and scope of the invention as expressed in the appended claims., Referring more particularly to the drawings, the invention i n-its broad aspects comprises-a plurality of individual display characters'or symbols. mounted in a; predetermined arrangement, J and any suitablemeansfor rendering the charac ters selectively visible to the human-eye indeter- "minately in anyone of a plurality of combinations or sequences representative of a game of chance. The display characters may be provided'inwariou's forms depending on the. particular gamethat itis desired 7 to depict, and .further dependingfon .the distance at which they are normally located from the observer. Preferably, theQdiSplay characters areiprovided in the form of individual'electric a lamps ll: (see Figa-l and 14) which' on semenluminated' become :selectiv'ely distinguishable. Electric lamps have the advantage that they are V visible at asubstantial distance. l h While the invention broadly maybe adapted to depict various games of chance, it is particularly suited for andihence' is'illustrated as portraying 'a gameof "dice; To this end, the electric lamps I'll are arranged in twov separate groups representing two dice. Preferably, each groupoflamps I H is provided with a visible background 18 representing one face of a die. The lamps ll representgth'e dots of the die, and are of such number and so arranged that, up0n selective illumination, any number from-one to six, corresponding to 1 the six sides of. the die, canbe made to appear in theproperpositio'n. Thulaeach groupiconsistsof sevenlamp's l1 which are arranged" in the general- -outline of the letter H, i. e, with six of the lamps arranged. in three uniformly vertically-spaced pairs 'of horizontally aligned lamps andltwo rows 7 V of; three vertically aligned la1nps,'"and with one 1 lamp located in the'center between andf'in'horifzontal alignment with the lamps of the inter diate pair. It will be evident that the means combinations of-dots from 1 to 6 on the different f sides of the'die may be represented by'illumi i nation respectively of the center lamp, 4 .8. twjo lamps of, the intermediate pair, eithenjdiagonal rowof three lamps, the four corner lamps, the centerlamps and the four cornerlamps, and the two vertical rows of lamps. Means for. depicting a game of chance, such as the dice game herein described, maybe used in numerous instances, p rticularly in connection with advertising matter; for the purpose of attracting attention, and is especially suited for animated window displays and large commercial' signboards. Forsuch uses, the display characters or lamps l] are adapted to be associated with trade slogans, the names of advertised products and/or'the names of advertisers, etc.- The element of uncertainty in the displaycoupled with knowledge of, the significance of the play serves to attract widespread and interested. attention, and hence greatly enhances the value :ofithe display as an advertising medium. 1 1 j The lamps ll may be mounted on any suitable support, such for example as a'di'splay board Iii. Means, operable at random, is providedlfor". illuminatingan indeterminate number of t the jlamps ll'jfor abrief period of time. This means "may be operated periodically and preferably autoim'atic'ally to produce a continuous serieslof. plays; ' struction to the switches 20; I The switch-elements 20 and 3| with the support element 20. In thepresentinstance', it comprises a plurality of individual lighting: circuits; each including a switchelement 2D, for connecting the lamps If! in parallel acrosselectric' mains 2| and 22 leading from a suitable source offcurrent (not shown). 'Eachcircuit includes-a lead 23 connecting one terminal ottheassociated lampT! to 'the main -2|, and a" lead 24 connecting the other lamp terminal to' oneterminal of the lassociated switch The terminals'of theswitch ele'- mentsiZD togwhich the leads 24 are connected preferably comprise respectively a plurality of hollow conducting cylinder' s 25, closed1 at the 7, ends, and rigidly mounted in a'common movable :support'ZG of insulating material '(see-Fi'gs, 9 and 10) A plunger 2 1 isqslidably mounted in each cylinder 25, and has an axial stein zilwhich extends outwardly through one end an of the cylinder and constitutes a switch contact A coiled compression spring-His disposed in each cylinder- 2 5 between the opposite'end'wall ofthe latterandithe'plunger fl, and tends to urge the stem contactrZil outwardly. The opposed contactmeans for the switch elements 20, in the form herein shown, is common to all, and comprises a single contactmember 3!] adapted to be moved relativelyinto engagement with ztwo or more of -the stem contacts 28f -To'comp'lete the circuit; 7 the contact'member'fifl is adaptedduring each operation to be connectedto the main 22 through a master switch element 3|v (see Fig. 11) mounted in themovable support'26, and similar in con-- constitutea multiple switch unit" 32. . To effect selective .operationof the switch elements 25, the contact member 'diiTerent-positions, and for'each position has a number of apertures 33 adapted 'to-receive certainof the movable stem contacts 28' without closing their respective'circuits. The remaining contacts 28, upon movement with thesupportzt toward thecontact member 36," will directly engage against thelllatterfto close the circuits for positions of the switch 26 collectively V 1 one position or;the.-other. lever' l i hasltwo spacedand' oppositely curved 3B is; movable into" thetwo rows are staggered laterally. The apertures33 of each group are also arranged in parallel rows adapted to be moved into operative registration with the rows of contacts 23. 1 . 'Iwo dice permit any one of thirty-six possible combinations. In order to make possible the selective illumination of the lamps E1 in similar combinations and arrangements, thirty-six different groups of properly spaced apertures 33 (see Fig. 12) are provided in the contact member 30. The'apertures 33 in the rows of the various groups varyin number from one to six. In each of the twelve rows. of any given number of apertures 33, the latter are located in relation to, the "contacts 28 to'efiect illumination of thelamps l l in the proper positions on the backgrounds l8. Thus,.each row of three apertures 32 will permit illumination of the four corner lamps l! of one group. It will be evident that the contact member 38, constitutes a selector element for the switches. ' The switch element 36 is located out of the range of the apertures 3 3,andhence will serve in each positionof the selectorelement 353 to complete the main circuit. Theselector element 38 may be provided many suitable form. Preferably; it comprises a flat annular disk'of conducting material in which the various groups of 'apertures.33 are disposed sub-- stantially radially and arranged in uniformly peripherally spaced relation. The selectordisk 36 (see Figs. 2 and '12) is removably secured coaxially to a supportingdisk 34'of insulating material having a hub 35 freely rotatable on a fixed shaft 3G. Opposite ends of the shaft 36 are securedas by means or set screws 31, in the upper ends of two parallel upstanding brackets 38 and t9 fixed on a base plate 40. To providemeans' for; moving the switch unit 33 towardland from the contact'face of the selector disk 35, thesupport 25 is rigidly mounted on the free'upper end of a vertical lever 4|. The lower end of the lever 4t is pivotally mounted .on an upstanding bracket arm- 42 rigid with the base plate 48, Two stops 83 are secured in spaced relation on the upper end of the arm 42 at oppositesides'of the lever 4i, and serve respectively to, limit or define the operative and inoperative unit 32 in relation to the contactdisk 38. j I " Formed on the lower end of the lever 4| is a lateral arm' l (see Figs. 7 and 8) which extends throughan elongated arcuate slot in one end of a lever 45. The arm 44 and the slot 45 provide a lost motion connection between the levers 4i and 16. The lever 46 is pivotally mounted intermediate its ends as indicated at '41 on a bearing racket 48 rigid with the base plate 48. An over center spring 49 tends to u'rge .theleverv 16 into The other end of the cam arms 59 and El adapted for:engagement by a pin v52 mounted eccentrically on a rotatable disk 53. The disk 53 is fixed on a drive shaft 56 journaied adjacent one end in the bracket 39 and at the other end in a short vertical bearing bracket rigid with the base plate 40. Thecam arm 59 normally extends into the downward path of the pin 52, and upon being engaged and depressed by the latter acts through .theleversfii and GI to move'the switch unit 32 against the action of the spring 49 into operative position. As an incident to this operation, the arm.5l,'which generally conforms to the curvature of the disk53, is lowered into the upward path of the'pin52. Subsequently, the pin' 52 engages" and elevates the cam arm 5| thereby rmo'vingfthe spring {59 over dead center andijcaus-i it to return theswitch uriitp32 into inopera- .tivc; position: Upon further movement. of the gpindi and until it againengages thecam'arm-EiL. it moves. closely along the inner. curvature. of the arm'd'i so' that the :switch unit, 32 is locked positively in inoperative position. r Means is provided for periodically imparting a free indeterminate rotary motion to the selector diskrBfi in timed relation to the'actuationof the switch unit so that the point or station in which thedisk will stop is left entirely to chance. in its preferred form, this means (see Figs. 2; 3, fl and 6 comprises a ratchet wheel 56 rigidly se'-, cured for rotation with the selector disk '33... A. V " pawl 15?, adapted to bejreleased' under theim- Qpulse ofstored venergy into; engagement with the a "ratchet wheel 56 Spas toimpart a sudden and substantialrotating. force thereto, is pivotally mounted intermediate its ends, asindicatedat 58, of the lever 5s, and aimed arm 63 on the base plate 4t, andtends to urge the pawl5'l in the direction of its working stroke. .providedfor moving the pawl 51 in a'return stroke, thereby storing'energy'in the spring 52, and for suddenly releasing: the pawl topermit its movement under the action of-the spring. This means preferably comprises a detent in the form :of a lever 64 pivotaily mounted intermediate its endsas at 65 on'the lever 559i Theiheel of the pawl ii! and the outer end of the detent 64. are connected by a' coiled'tensionspring Biltendingtto; , urge the pawl toward the ratchet'wheel 55. A "stop'pin .55? on the lever fifiengages the underside of the'detent 54, andserves to define the normal position of the latter. "The free inner end or the .detent 64 is. formedwith an abutment face which is disposed in the path of a revolving pin 69 mounted eccentrically on a disk ldfixed on the shaft 5 5. ;Uponrotation of the disk It in a counterclockwise direction, as viewed in Fig. 4, the pin 69 engages the face 68 and movesthe as.- sembly or" the pawl 52'', the lever 59 and'the detent it againstthe action of thesprin'g 62' into 'the positionfishown in; full outline, thereby storing energy in the spring and positioning the pawl for engagement with the ratchet wheel 56. The pin I Strides gradually across the face 68. Ultimately, by reason of the increased inclination of the thrust, the detent t l snaps upwardly outof en gagement with the pin sihwhereupon the spring 52 imparts a sharp kick to the pawl 51. The latter immediately engages the ratchet wheel 56 and causes the latter to spin rapidly. j To provide means'forseparating the pawl 5'! from'theratchet wheel, Et at the end ofthe working stroke and during the return stroke, so thattherotationof the wheel will be unh'amper ed, the toe'of the pawl is formed with a lateral lug H which movesinto engagement with aholdout memo'en. In the present instance, this mem oer comprises an elongated leaf. spring'TZ which J .is secured atone endto and extendsfalong the underside of a supporting plate '13 mounted on 1 Trip means is The other end of the anchoredat its ends respectively'to the post, and the, lever 89 tends to urge the latter toward v Tthewheelti; The positionjof the lever 852 is controlledhya camt lifixed o-n-the shaft E i, and having an arcuate face 95 ofsubstantial radius 'andja second. faceele of re ducedradius The .faces '95 and tears connectedby anabrupt drop forces theapawl 5! downwardly away from the wheelet and causes it tosnap past thefree end of thespring WI In the return stroke, the lug l I the bracket arm 39. :Intheworking stroke-0f thei :pawl 51, thelug H movesvabovethe plate 13. At' T the endof the stroke, a. pin 59 on the lever59 rides alcng'the underside. of thespring 127,;and Q return the pawl 57 into operative position; I f Means is set into. operation. after a predeterini'ned period of time, but'independentlyoi on passing off the spring, per1nits the spring- 56 to; the actual extent of rotation, test-op the selector. 7 , disk 33 and tolocate it accurately in cneof its 'various positions. This meanscornprises a brak- T ing mechanism,.shown'in Fig. 13,.for'first slowing down the rotationof the disk 353, and'a'stop mechanism, illustratedin Fig.5, for then definitely arresting the movement" of the disk: and adjusting the finalposition thercoi to locate one lation tothe switch unit 32. group of apertures 33 in accurately opposed re- The braking mechanism in its preferredicrm utilizes the hub 35 on the disk 38 as a brake drum, and comprises a curved friction shoe. i i movable into and out of engagement with one peripheral The shoe is is carriedhy the side of the drum. upper end of a vertical lever le whieh is pivotally mounted at its lower end on a shaft'iS supported in the arm 63 and a lug Tl on. the base; plate A coiled tension spring is is. anchored at its ends respectively to the upp'er end oi the lever "i5 and a post '53 on the base plate 48, and tends to urge theshoe E i towardthe drum 35. Pivotallysecured at oneend as at 8l'l'to the lever 75, and carrying a cam follower 8! at the other end, is transverse leverarm ilfi. Two stops 83 on the lever l5 are 'located at -opposite sides of. the arm 82, and serve to hold-the latter substantially in horizontal position. The follower Bl. coacts with a rotary cam 84 fixed on the shaft The earn B l serves to control the applicationof -the' brake shoe i i, and to this end'has a-peripheral cam face 85 of which the major portion is circular and adapted to hold the shoe out of brakingposition. The circular portion of the cam face 85 is interruptedby aideep-notch 88 adapted to receive the follower 8h The notch Etis located in such angular phase relation to the'pin 52 that after the latter has caused the selectorldisk 3?! to be setinto motion, the notch will receive the follower 3i, thereh yperrnitting the'spring l8 toappiy the frictionhrake shoe, 'M.= As a'result, the selector disk So is slowed downpreparatory to being stopped. Rigidly securedto one end of the hub-BS is an index wheel Bl having a plurality of V-shaped teeth ES'correspondingin number and spacingto the groupsof apertures 33, ,A detent lever sfiis pivotally mounted-at one end on the .shaf it. on the wheel 8l.. 9'5 and ariser face QB. ,Coacting withthe cam B l is afollower 99 on one end of a lever arm H36. The other end of the arm lEit ispivo-tally secured lever 89 has a stop. 32 niov able into engagement between any two teeth 88 A coiled tension springs3 l9 1 fiasat lel tothel'everts." Twel a V 5611 the leverils rve tohold the arm its sungx-stantiall perpendicularto the lever. The{cam" f i v -94 bears a phase relation tothepin 69 and the cam 84 suchthatthe'stop 9 2 is withdrawn from the wheel 87 shortly before the pin 69 isdisengaged from the detent 64 to institute rotation of .theselecto'r disk 3G,:th'en is held" in inoperative position during-asuch rotation until after the brake. shoe 7 8 has been applied and released, and finally is movedinto'engagement with the wheel by'the spring 93, The stop 92 will .engageba" tween any two particular teeth 88initspath at "the time it is released, and through acannning' 7 action with one tooth or the .other will adjust. the fdiskflil accurately, into position to present onegroup of-the apertures 33 to the switch unit ing the control shaft .56, Preferably, the shaft 54 is driven continuously by power means, .and to this end is connected through removable speedchange gears. 503, and a speed reduction device I04 to an electric motor H35 on the base plate ii]. Theoperation 'ofthe game device will beevident from, the foregoing description. Briefly stated, the ,shaft 545i is rotated'continuously. In- the course of rotation, the cam face 95 separates the stopBZ from'the wheel 8? to release the disk 30 for rotation, The pinBS, actuatcs'the'detent cc to store ,up' energy in'the spring 52, and shortly afterthe'stopflZ is withdrawn from the wheel '87, is moved out of the path of the detent' to re- ;lease the pawl 51 inits working stroke sov asto impart :an unrestrained spin to the selector disk 30. After a predetermined time, the brake shoe 14 is, applied toislow down'the disk 35 and then is released.- subsequently the cam drcip-Qlrides on" thefollower QSto return the stop 92! into engagement withthe'wheel 81 so as to stop and Y locate the selector disk 30 in one of its various stations. The impositive braking of the disk 39 serves to prevent excessive impact between the ;wheel 8'1 and the silo-p192, and also aids in mm ,de'ring-the extent of rotation of the disk uncertain'. -Thereafter, the'pin52 causes the switch :unit32 to be moved intooperative relationto the particular. group of apertures 33 selected by 1 chance, and after a briefperiod'to be withdrawn into its idlepositionn The lamps I? corresponding to the apertures 33 of'the, selected group are thus flashed to complete onejplayof the. device. In the. continuedpperation of the device," the ioregoing cycle is periodically repeated. Since 7 the degree of'rotation of the-selector disk 3011s 7 not measured or timed, but is left entirely to chance, the same combination or various fsequences of combinations may be produced in sue cessive plays. I claim as my invention: . 1; An animated electrical display sign com prising, in combination, a plurality ofelectric lamps, display means for supporting said lamps Tin fixed'position, said lamps being arranged in two distinct groups; the lamps being of such number and so arranged that upon selective illumination in numbers from one'to six ofeach group they simulate the spots on any one side of ;a die and of both groups jointly permit of thirtysix possible combinations, and electrical control means automatically operable periodically to select by, chance and flash simultaneously-1 the lamps of any one of said combinations, where-. by a successionofindeterminate plays are obtained. g 2-. An animated electrical displaysign 'com- 7 prising, in combination, aplura'lity of electric lamps, display means. for supporting said lamps Any suitablemeans may be provided for driv 2,012,544 I d I V in fixed position, said lamps being arranged in two distinct groups, the lamps of said groups being-adapted to be illuminated in any one of a plurality of combinations differing in the numv beri and relative association of the lamps of both group s,and-electrical control means automatically operable at predetermined time intervals in recurrent cycles and during each cycle to select by chance and flash simultaneously the lamps of anyone of said combinations, whereby a succession of indeterminate combinations are obtained..- '3, A chance game device comprising, in combination, a plurality of electriclainps, means for supporting said lamps in: fixed position, said clamps being arranged in two distinct groups rep-- resenting two dice, the-lamps of each group corresponding in number and arrangement toall bination, a plurality of electric lamps, means for supporting said lamps in fixed position, said lamps being arranged in a predetermined group and adapted upon selective illumination in numbers from one to six' to 'simulatein number and location the spots on any one'side of a die, and electrical control means operable at random to select by chance and flash any one "or said numbers of clamps; 5.'A chance'game. device comprising, in combination, a plurality of electric lamps, means for supporting said lamps, said lamps being arranged in two'groups, the lamps of each group being adapted upon selective illumination in numbers I froin'one to six to simulate the spots of any one side of a die, the'lamps of said two groups joint- .ly permitting'of any one of thirty-six combinations;-electric circuits including a plurality of parallel switches one for controlling each lamp, and selector means operable at random for closingan indeterminate number of said switches to flash any one of said combinations of lampsineluding at least one 01 each group. ,6. A game device comprising, in combination, a plurality of electric lamps, means for supporting saidilamps in fixed position, said lamps being arranged in two distinct groups representing two dice, the lamps of. each group corresponding in number and arrangement to all of the possible locations/of spots on the sides of one die, and'adapted uponv selective illumination in numbers from one to six to simulate any one side'of a die, and electrical control means oper able to select and flash simultaneously the lamps 'of any one of said numbers for each of said groups. 7.;An animated electrical display sign comprising, in combination, a plurality of electric lamps, meansfor supporting said lamps, said lamps being" adapted for selective illumination in numbers from one to six to simulate the spots of. anyone side of a die, electric circuits including a'plurality of parallel switches one for controllingeach lamp, and means for controlling said switches to flash simultaneously any one of said numbers of lamps. 8. A chance game device comprising, in combinati0n,,a plurality of; electric lamps, means 7 2,012,544 for supporting said lamps said lamps being ai ranged intwo gr'oupsgthelamps being adapted; ' contact disk having -tliirty-six different positions and having a plurality of sets of contact areas one setfor each position'adapted to coact respectively with said first mentioned contacts controlling said combinations; means for imparting an unrestrained and indeterminate rotation to said disk, means for temporarily braking said disk to slow down the rotation thereof, means subsequently operable to stop said disk and to, locate saiddisk in one of said positions, and means for then effecting relative movement of said contacts and said disk into and out of coacting relation to flash the combination of lamps selected by chance in the random rotation of said disk. I 9. A chance game device comprising, in combination, a plurality of electric lamps, means for supporting said lamps, said lamps being .arranged in two groups, the lamps being adapted upon selective illumination innumbers from one to six for each group to simulate the spots of any one side of a die and for both groups to per: mit of thirty-six possible combinations, electric circuits including a plurality of parallel switch contacts one for controlling each lamp, a movable selector contact element having thirty-six different positions and having a plurality of sets of contact areas one set for each position adapted to coact respectively with said first mentioned contacts controlling said combinationsmeans'for imparting an indeterminate movement'to said element, means subsequently operable to stop said element and to locate said element in one of said positions, and means for then effecting relative movement of said contacts and said element into and out of coacting relation to flash the combination of lamps selected by chance in the random movement of said element. 10. A chance game device comprising, in com-. bination, a plurality of electric lamps, means for supporting said lamps, said lamps being adapt ed upon selective illumination in numbers from one to six to simulate the spots of anyone side of a die, electric circuits including a plurality of parallel switch contacts one for controlling each lamp, a'movable selector contact'element having a plurality of difierent idle'positions and having a plurality of sets of contact areas one set for each of said positions adapted to coact respectively with said first mentioned contacts'for said various'numbers of lamps, means ror imparting an indeterminate movement to said element, means subsequently operable to stop said element in one of said positions, and means for then efiiecting relative movementof said contacts and said element into and out of coacting relation to flash the lamps selected by chance in the random movement of said element. j 11. A chance gamedevice comprising, in combination, a plurality of symbols, means for supporting said symbols in fixed position, said sym-' bols being arranged intwo predetermined groups representing two dice, said symbols, of each group being adapted upon selective display in u various combinations to simulate innumber and location the spots on any one side of one die, and means automatically operable repeatedly at} 7 simultaneously "an indeterminate random to select by charts and display anyione t of a plurality of combinations of"saidsymbols, each combination ,including 'fromone to symbols of each group. H I V '12; 'A chance game device comprising, incombination, a plurality of -"symbols, me'ans for up-Q porting said symbols-in fixed-position, said sym bols being arranged lin "a -predetermined' group; and adapted uponselectivedisplayto simulateinnumber and location the spots on any one side of a, die, and means automatically operable periodicallyto select at random and display a- I succession bf combinations, each indeterminate as to number from one to six, of said symbols. 13. A chance game device comprising, in combination, a plurality of symbols,. means for supporting said symbols in fixed position, said symbols being arranged in a predetermined group and adapted upon selective display to simulatepin number and location the spots on any one side oia die, and means operable at random to select by chance and display 7 number, from one to six, of said symbols. I 1 14. A chance game device comprising, incomment, and selector means automatically periodi- V cally actuated for operation at random to dis-: ;play a succession of indeterminate combinations of said-symbols, the relativeflocation of the symbols of each cornbinatiorifbeing determined'by the number of symbols displayed. 15. A chance gamedevicecomprising, in com- 7 bination, :a pluralityiof symbols, means for -sup-' porting saidsyrnbolsin a, predeterminedfixed arrangement, and selector means automatically 7 operable inrecurrent cycles to displaysaid sym-. bols in'a succession of indeterminate co-mbina-' tions, the number of symbols includedin each combination being determined "by chance, i 7 l6. A chanc'e game device comprising, in combination, a plurality of symbols supported in fixed, lber and association, of the symbols of each group. bination, a plurality of'electri-cally controlled symbols, means for Supporting saidsym-bols in a predetermined fixed arrangement, electrical means including'a.selectorfmovable into differ ent positions to effect the displayof -said symbols in different combinations, means for imparting an uncontrolled and indeterminate movet y v V '17. A chance game device comprising, in com- I ment to said selector, and means automatically operable after a predetermined time interval to stop said selector, whereby the chance display of one combination of symbols is effected. 18 A chance game device comprising, combination, a plurality of electrically controlled symbols, means for supporting said'symbols in a predetermined fixed arrangement, electrical means including a selector'movable into diners ent positions to effect the display of said' s'ymbols in different combinations,.powerpperable means for imparting an uncontrolled and insubsequently operable to brake the movement of determinate movement tosaid selector, means 25' bination, a plurality of symbols, means for. sup- ,"Q porting said symbols in a predetermined arrangef

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Cited By (5)

    Publication numberPublication dateAssigneeTitle
    US-2579241-ADecember 18, 1951Raymond T MoloneyPermutation and combination mechanism
    US-2641473-AJune 09, 1953Burton E StalterChance apparatus
    US-2665914-AJanuary 12, 1954Raymond T MoloneyPermutation and combination control circuit
    US-2693962-ANovember 09, 1954Stevens RobertDice game apparatus
    US-3357703-ADecember 12, 1967Elliott & Evans IncCombined clock and chance device